Recipe: ‘Hangop’ (a.k.a. Dutch curd or strained yoghurt)

This is part two of the recipes I used to throw a dinner party for some friends a little over a week ago. Last week, I posted the recipe for the pumpkin soup which was the starter. I already blogged about the main course recipe a while ago, as it were pancakes. Today, I will therefore show you what I did for the dessert. I made a traditional Dutch dessert which is called hangop. Hangop is translated into English as curd or strained yoghurt, even though strained buttermilk is probably the best translation for what it actually is. Anywho, this is what it looks like:

It’s a thick, creamy substance that is left after draining all liquids from yoghurt or buttermilk. The traditional Dutch recipe uses buttermilk, but in modern times people have resorted to using yoghurt. As it is thicker you will need less yoghurt to make a good amount and since I was cooking for 7 adults and 3 kids I need quite a bit. That’s why I used yoghurt instead of buttermilk.

The recipe is super simple. It just takes a long time before it is ready, as it’s best to drain the liquids overnight. So it does require some thought and planning, but the result will be great.

Here’s what you need for 8 people:

– 2 liters of yoghurt (or 8 liters of buttermilk)

– A large bowl

– A large sif or any bowl with holes in it.

– A tea towel (or other thin fabric)

– Patience 😉

How to make it:

1.) Place your sif into the large bowl

2.) Wet the tea towel and cover your sif with it

3.) Pour yoghurt into towel

4.) Tie the towel at the top

5.) Put in the fridge and leave overnight (it takes at least 4 – 5 hours)

Not too appetizing to watch, but this is what you’ll get when you leave it overnight: drained liquid.

6.) Scoop into a large bowl or you can put it into cups, ready to be served.

Your towel will be a mess, but this is what it’ll be easy to scoop out.

Serving tips:

– If you find the cream too sour you can make some whipped cream and stir that in or you can add some creme fraîche.

–  There are several toppings you can put with it. Brown sugar, syrup, walnuts & honey, apple & cinnamon, red fruits, granola… You name it. Just figure out what would fit the season and you can make it work whenever. I opted for apple sauteed in a bit of butter with some sugar and cinnamon, as well as toasted walnuts and a swirl of honey.

Enjoy!

6 Comments Add yours

  1. AWildDog says:

    That, does not look nice….

    1. indiequeen84 says:

      lolz. The draining looks gross, but it’s very much like cream cheese! It has that sort of structure!

      1. AWildDog says:

        I might give a try, but with a small amount of yogurt cus I’m not convinced that it’s at all nice tasting!

      2. indiequeen84 says:

        It’s very smooth and soft and well it does taste good. Trust me. But I made this much for 8 people, so if you’re making it for just yourself only 1/2 liters of yogurt would suffice

  2. Jennifer says:

    Is the strained yoghurt kwark? I lived in The Netherlands for one year (long ago) and if that is kwark I can tell you that it is so, so, soooo good! We have nothing like it, that I have found, in the U.S. I came across this blog while trying to find kwark!

    1. indiequeen84 says:

      Nope it’s thicker and has a milder, creamier flavor than kwark. You could use kwark to make this, or you could use buttermilk. The English translation for kwark is cottage cheese. Don’t know if it’s anything like it though.

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